WHAT OUR CLIENTS SAY...

Our marriage seemed like more of a struggle than anything else. By the time we came in for counseling, both of us were thinking that divorce was the only solution. But it did not take us long to figure out that we had not really been communicating very well, or rather, that we were not hearing what the other person was saying and we were making assumptions that were just not valid. By learning how to listen and hear each other, we were able to rediscover the love that had brought us together in the first place.

—Anonymous

Anger


We all know what anger is, and we've all felt it: whether as a fleeting annoyance or as full-fledged rage. Anger is a completely normal, usually healthy, human emotion. But when it gets out of control and turns destructive, it can lead to problems at work, in your personal relationships, and in the overall quality of your life. The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; it inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviors, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. A certain amount of anger, therefore, is necessary to our survival.

On the other hand, we can't physically lash out at every person or object that irritates or annoys us; laws, social norms, and common sense place limits on how far our anger can take us.

If you feel as though you're at the mercy of an unpredictable and powerful emotion, that your anger is really out of control, if it is having an impact on your relationships and on important parts of your life, you might consider counseling to learn how to handle it better. A psychologist or other licensed mental health professional can work with you in developing a range of techniques for changing your thinking and your behavior.

Anger and Violence in Contemporary Society, by Dr. Randy Simmonds, Clinical Director and Counselor at the Samaritan Counseling Center - (http://samaritan-vail.org/index.php/vail-counseling/resources/anger-and-violence-in-contemporary-society/)

Controlling Anger Before It Controls You - American Psychological Association fact sheet from their Psychology in Daily LifeĀ series. (http://www.apa.org/topics/controlanger.html)